leden 2010

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Comments

Heather

You seem to have some pretty deep attachments to NIN/Reznor --- during my high school years Downward Spiral made its peak.
Also, I seem to remember a toga party in college & 'Closer' in a kaleidoscope haze. Pop Culture at its best, I guess. Regardless, I drank it all in!
But the last NIN song I remember (I liked) is Perfect Drug.

There was this one song on Downward Spiral that played the same melody over and over but with different collaboration of instruments --- if I remember correctly. I thought it was the coolest thing ever.

If you find it before I do --- I'd like to find that song again. Just for the fun of it.

Jane

I'm not sure what song you're talking about, Heather, but for the record, my favorite was Big Man with a Gun. That one kicked ass. I think even Trent Reznor himself was a little uncomfortable with that number.

kate

This fabulous post puts me in mind of the Draculesque "Perfect Drug" video that we played into oblivion, along with the other grim-glam visions of The Trent. He was a little powder keg.

On the new record, hope springs eternal, but after the last underwhelming go, I applaud you for hanging in there. Also...Little Trenty was so 90's, I wonder if he's up to making an updated version of himself that speaks the new languages that are going around...or maybe, as before, creating a new one. We'll see.

-K

Jane

The last effort was as musically impressive as ever, but the literal content was just so... I don't know, sad, or something. I wanted emergence and evolution, and it felt like there was some kind of stagnation there. One can only hope there's been some development, since then. Maybe. I've actually heard two of the songs, leaked to the internet, you know, and though I'm reluctant to pass judgement on them out of context, they feel like a new day. I need the whole picture before I can assess, but hopes are high.

That "Perfect Drug" video was so Edward Gorey come to life! Loved it!

rcjohnso

http://www.nme.com/news/111454.htm

Amen, Bob.

Jane

What a fat load, Rian. There's plenty of interest if you look for it, and there's a lot of total crap. I'm not really surprised that Bob Dylan doesn't tune into the genius of what's good nowadays, but that crotchety old guy talk is mularkey. There's as much good stuff as ever.

rcjohnso

NONSENSE!!! EVERYTHING NEW SUCKS!!!! EVERYTHING I TELLS YA!!!!!

HAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHA!!!!

Jane

Jackass.

Howler

See? Hard at work, apparently.

Jane

Nice, Howler. Thanks!

Dark basement? CHECK.
Computers? CHECK.
Black T-Shirt? CHECK.

I'm looking forward to it. What can I tell you? Old habits die hard.

Howler

You didn't like The Fragile?

Matt Ambrose

All those gizmos are so much masturbatory LUBRICANT!

Jane

Howler: You'd think I didn't, after having declared it lacking in interesting process and characterizing it's content as lacking in evolution, but actually, I did like it a lot - I loved the way it lacked the hermetically sealed, decisive perfection of The Downward Spiral. It struck me, in a lot of ways, as a really brave CD - emotional and difficult in a nice way. I love the sense of singularity there always in on his records, and The Fragile had that going for it in spades. Everytime he starts crowing about how much more "collaborative" his new work is going to be, I shake my head and think, "don't bother with that, baby." The Fragile had loads of the things I loved - especially the massive, oceanic picture it painted of the inner life and the way the songs weren't really as discreet from one another. Also, the hopeful sort of feeling there was in it in some places - but I've always felt that angsty rock was all about hope. Needless to say, I was fully in support of the indulgence of a double CD effort. Still, it just felt a bit emotionally repetitive in some ways, and a bit sad. Also, he lost me on some of the screeching, particulary "Starfuckers, Inc." which I thought was petty and dumb. I felt like serving up the ANY of the same rage AGAIN was, in some instances, a bit disappointing. Having said that, it was still marked all over with his special, and seriously beloved genius (and when I say "marked" I mean in a similar manner to the way my little dog marks every vertical object he passes whenever he sets paw outside the front door) and god knows I love that.

Matt: I KNOW! Impressive array of TOYS, Trent.

Jane Again

Apparently, HRH has been taking questions from the peanut gallery on the NIN website. Here's my favorite. Plus, this is funny, and so is this.

Ooh! Catching up on the NINternet is fun!

and again...

Sorry, last one. Matt, suffice it to say that you hit the nail on the head.

Howler

It sounds to me like "used to" isn't exactly the point, here. It's OK to love Trent. Embrace the love, Jane.

Crazy (for reals this time) Jane

Ah, Howler. You look into my very soul. Why do you think I filed this post under "love letters"? It's dangerous, though. If only you knew how much Trent Reznor, and the true love I once bore him, was totally like heroin. Am I the only one who falls epilepticly in love with favorite artists and other fictional characters? Aye, me.

rcjohnso

Blood on the Tracks. Now THERE was an album. Real guitars. Harrumph.

Jane

Ok, Mr. "In my day, we didn't have any fancy COMPOOTERS! We used REAL MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS, and we LIKED IT. Drum Machines Have No Soul, man."

:insert eyerolling emoticon here:

kate

I know I have no cache here (being an oldster), but Bob (and Rian) DO have a point. Knowing where you come from, what trajectory you're on and having awareness of the genius that you are standing atop, and the genius in your own hand, does give added SOUL to an artist. Nothing comes out of thin creative air in the final analysis but untimately forgetable stinky wind. "Artists" that create in their own vaccuum have a vacuous (pun intended) side to their efforts.

Also, having knowledge of and being able to actually PLAY and communicate through the instruments you aspire to is the sign of musicianship. The Wild Horses, however charming and cute, will NEVER rule the universe with their music. Those types need a lot of producers, technocrap and stagecraft to make their sound...but can they stand on their own and still hold an audience enrapt like Bob...not likely. Just check out "It's Alright Ma,I'm Only Bleeding" from his Australia tour with Tom Petty. Or, better yet, the incomperable concert I saw in San Francisco when he began his "christian Bob" tour where he started out with the audience actually throwing vegatables, and by the end, as he drove straight up like a big, black locomotive, ended the concert with a very protracted standing ovation from the vegatable throwers. By-the-way, could most of the acts now even DO something that would cause such a response because the music or ideas broke such new ground?

All one had to do is get a good whiff of the Grammys to smell the stink in music these days, its unoriginal referential repititive do-dah. All glam and sham. Entertaining sometimes, but so lacking in depth and skill that it's actually heartbreaking. It seems rather ironic that in the face of all the bump and grind and red lipstick that Ray Charles got the accolades.

Yes, there's still good music out there, if you look for it, but why do we have to sift through so much shit to find it? It wasn't always that way.

Tara H.

Yeah.

Jane

Kate, you of all people should know how much I love Bob, and that I am SO HIP to the fact that what's available is mostly crap. What I simply will not buy is the notion that soulful music can't be made with new and other tools. Not everything has to trace it's roots back to THE BLUES or some shit to be worthy. Trent Reznor, for instance, is a classically trained pianist, and even if he is working within the confined spaces of his angst-ridden-hood, he's certainly not working in a musical vacuum, which is completely obvious when you listen to his music. This is not a defense of Linkin Park and Good Charlotte that I'm mounting here - a lot of that shit does stink - but there's a lot that's really good and interesting, too.

Also, Nostalgia is totally lame, and giving Ray Charles all the awards this year was totally lame. I've got nothing but respect for Ray Charles, but that was the Grammy equivalent of giving the Oscar to the gimp.

kate

Jane:

I got no problem with Trent...he's the real thing, or WAS...the question that's up is can he keep it going. Here's hoping he can,'cause he had the juice.

And YES, there ARE interesting things. Very good things...thing not made on GUITARS. On the other hand, Ray Charles JUST DIED. He made music until he died. He's not actually nostalgia. Who would you have given the grammys to, U2? They could ALSO be called nostalgia. The problem is what's up right now. What dominates the taste buds of the mass will be what you eat. Benny Goodman is nostalgia. And facts are facts...no one is asking, on the whole, for the vast majority of the music out there to rise to the occassion.

I have hope though...music seems to have 10 year cycles. It's so bad now, it's time for a revolution and I look for it.

Jane

I'd have voted to give the awards to Green Day; that record is the shit. Ray Charles has done work that so far outstrips that torturous Norah Jones duet that it's embarrassing to award it. That he just died is the only reason it happened. I'm not saying I don't like and revere old music, but I am saying that I'm much more interested in new music. One really juicy new thing is better than 5,000,000 hours of listening to someone like Eric Clapton get in touch with his roots... AGAIN.

Maria Alva

Spankin' hot and sexy love letter, C.J.

My industrial late -Eighties were spent with Skinny Puppy...but I do have to say one of my Absolute Favorite Shows Ever was Pigface Seattle 1990, fronted by the Rez all fake (or real?) bloody and swaddled in endless lengths of gauze...so massive a performance by the whole ensemble that the little tweaker/acid kiddies down in front went into catatonic shock...they thought they'd be getting a dose of NIN, a relatively mild band in comparison...I was fucking ecstatic the whole time!

And guess who's going on tour in 2005 (i.e. still kicking)? Pigface, my friends...

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